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High-end AVR vs. low-end ARM?

  1. High-end AVR vs. low-end ARM?

    In terms of pricing, how do high-end AVR's (Mega-128) compare to low-end ARM
    processors? The ARM's are much more powerfull and have large RAM memories on
    them.

    Anyone ever compare them? I heard that ARM's are cheaper than AVR's these
    days. Is this true?



  2. Re: High-end AVR vs. low-end ARM?

    On 6 Nov, 21:42, "Bresco" wrote:
    > In terms of pricing, how do high-end AVR's (Mega-128) compare to low-end ARM
    > processors? The ARM's are much more powerfull and have large RAM memories on
    > them.
    >
    > Anyone ever compare them? I heard that ARM's are cheaper than AVR's these
    > days. Is this true?


    ARM chips like the NXP LPC2000 can be cheaper than high-end AVRs, and
    offer much more performance. However, they consume more power and
    could work out more expensive by the time they are put on a PCB,
    because of the requirement for two supplies.

    Leon

  3. Re: High-end AVR vs. low-end ARM?

    On Nov 6, 9:37 pm, An Schwob in the USA wrote:
    > On Nov 6, 1:50 pm, Leon wrote:
    >
    > > On 6 Nov, 21:42, "Bresco" wrote:

    >
    > > > In terms of pricing, how do high-end AVR's (Mega-128) compare to low-end ARM
    > > > processors? The ARM's are much more powerfull and have large RAM memories on
    > > > them.

    >
    > > > Anyone ever compare them? I heard that ARM's are cheaper than AVR's these
    > > > days. Is this true?

    >
    > > ARM chips like the NXP LPC2000 can be cheaper than high-end AVRs, and
    > > offer much more performance. However, they consume more power and
    > > could work out more expensive by the time they are put on a PCB,
    > > because of the requirement for two supplies.

    >
    > > Leon

    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > @ Leon, I agree in everything but one, the power consumption. For
    > example the mentioned LPC2000 can run with 40 mAs @ 70 MHz (2103), my
    > guess would be you need 10 AVRs, running @ 16 MHz to match the
    > performance in computing. AFAIK they need more than 4 mAs @ 16 MHz.
    > On the other hand there is a HUGE difference in standby current. AVRs
    > at least the older ones can go into standby mode at or below 1uA, if
    > one if the ARM devices gets hot the standby current exceeds 100 uAs
    > easily.


    Just one more thing. The 1.8V to 5.5V operating range for the AVR is
    very useful for battery devices. You usually need higher than 1.8V,
    even for ARM with build-in regulator.


  4. Re: High-end AVR vs. low-end ARM?

    >>As for AVR32, in case you were thinking about that one, there is no
    >>real reason I would know why to start with that device. Use a Cortex-
    >>M3 device instead the upcoming standard.


    Let's see,

    Where do I get the Cortex-M3 flash chip with

    * Lower power consumption than any existing Cortex-M3 chip
    * Single 1,8V +/- 10% power-supply for CORE *AND* I/O?
    * 5V VCC , desirable for motor control?
    * debug support allowing you to read/write internal registers without
    stopping the MCU.
    * High Speed USB
    * Free Eclipse/GCC tool directly supported by the silicon vendor
    * Sustained 33 DSP MIPS when doing vector sums
    for(sum=0; i = 0; i < n; i++) sum = sum + C[i] * X[i];
    * Migration path to low cost versions supporting Linux.
    * Same H/W tools as the AVR (JTAG-ICE Mk II & STK600)
    * Trace capable emulator at below $600 (AVRONE)

    Googling does not give any clue...


    --
    Best Regards,
    Ulf Samuelsson
    This is intended to be my personal opinion which may,
    or may not be shared by my employer Atmel Nordic AB



  5. Re: High-end AVR vs. low-end ARM?

    Ulf Samuelsson wrote:

    >>>As for AVR32, in case you were thinking about that one, there is no
    >>>real reason I would know why to start with that device. Use a Cortex-
    >>>M3 device instead the upcoming standard.

    >
    >
    > Let's see,
    >
    > Where do I get the Cortex-M3 flash chip with
    >
    > * Lower power consumption than any existing Cortex-M3 chip
    > * Single 1,8V +/- 10% power-supply for CORE *AND* I/O?
    > * 5V VCC , desirable for motor control?
    > * debug support allowing you to read/write internal registers without
    > stopping the MCU.
    > * High Speed USB
    > * Free Eclipse/GCC tool directly supported by the silicon vendor
    > * Sustained 33 DSP MIPS when doing vector sums
    > for(sum=0; i = 0; i < n; i++) sum = sum + C[i] * X[i];
    > * Migration path to low cost versions supporting Linux.
    > * Same H/W tools as the AVR (JTAG-ICE Mk II & STK600)
    > * Trace capable emulator at below $600 (AVRONE)


    How much flash, with the above combinations ?

    -jg


  6. Re: High-end AVR vs. low-end ARM?



    "Jim Granville" skrev i meddelandet
    news:4914aeba$1@clear.net.nz...
    > Ulf Samuelsson wrote:
    >
    >>>>As for AVR32, in case you were thinking about that one, there is no
    >>>>real reason I would know why to start with that device. Use a Cortex-
    >>>>M3 device instead the upcoming standard.

    >>
    >>
    >> Let's see,
    >>
    >> Where do I get the Cortex-M3 flash chip with
    >>
    >> * Lower power consumption than any existing Cortex-M3 chip
    >> * Single 1,8V +/- 10% power-supply for CORE *AND* I/O?
    >> * 5V VCC , desirable for motor control?
    >> * debug support allowing you to read/write internal registers without
    >> stopping the MCU.
    >> * High Speed USB
    >> * Free Eclipse/GCC tool directly supported by the silicon vendor
    >> * Sustained 33 DSP MIPS when doing vector sums
    >> for(sum=0; i = 0; i < n; i++) sum = sum + C[i] * X[i];
    >> * Migration path to low cost versions supporting Linux.
    >> * Same H/W tools as the AVR (JTAG-ICE Mk II & STK600)
    >> * Trace capable emulator at below $600 (AVRONE)

    >
    > How much flash, with the above combinations ?
    >
    > -jg
    >


    The full combination does not exist.
    Just listed some properties, that could make people want
    to think twice about focusing 100% on CM3.

    UC3L = 1.8V VCC
    UC3C = 5V
    UC3A3 = High Speed USB
    UC3B & UC3L should be lower power than CM3
    UC3A/C has 66 MHz operation and thus 33 DSP MIPS
    AP7 runs Linux, Need Cortex-A8 for this and that ain't cheap.

    In the end, it will be the right combination of peripherals
    which will be key to the decision.


    --
    Best Regards,
    Ulf Samuelsson
    This is intended to be my personal opinion which may,
    or may not be shared by my employer Atmel Nordic AB



  7. Re: High-end AVR vs. low-end ARM?

    Ulf Samuelsson wrote:
    > Where do I get the Cortex-M3 flash chip with
    > * Lower power consumption than any existing Cortex-M3 chip


    Well, duuuuuh. It's an impossible question!

  8. Re: High-end AVR vs. low-end ARM?



    "Clifford Heath" skrev i meddelandet
    news:4914cc31$0$4449$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
    > Ulf Samuelsson wrote:
    >> Where do I get the Cortex-M3 flash chip with
    >> * Lower power consumption than any existing Cortex-M3 chip

    >
    > Well, duuuuuh. It's an impossible question!


    Yep, but I think people get the hint ;-)


    --
    Best Regards,
    Ulf Samuelsson
    This is intended to be my personal opinion which may,
    or may not be shared by my employer Atmel Nordic AB



  9. Re: High-end AVR vs. low-end ARM?

    Jim Granville wrote:
    > Ulf Samuelsson wrote:
    >
    >>>> As for AVR32, in case you were thinking about that one, there is no
    >>>> real reason I would know why to start with that device. Use a Cortex-
    >>>> M3 device instead the upcoming standard.

    >>
    >>
    >> Let's see,
    >>
    >> Where do I get the Cortex-M3 flash chip with
    >>
    >> * Lower power consumption than any existing Cortex-M3 chip
    >> * Single 1,8V +/- 10% power-supply for CORE *AND* I/O?
    >> * 5V VCC , desirable for motor control?
    >> * debug support allowing you to read/write internal registers without
    >> stopping the MCU.
    >> * High Speed USB
    >> * Free Eclipse/GCC tool directly supported by the silicon vendor
    >> * Sustained 33 DSP MIPS when doing vector sums
    >> for(sum=0; i = 0; i < n; i++) sum = sum + C[i] * X[i];
    >> * Migration path to low cost versions supporting Linux.
    >> * Same H/W tools as the AVR (JTAG-ICE Mk II & STK600)
    >> * Trace capable emulator at below $600 (AVRONE)

    >
    > How much flash, with the above combinations ?
    >
    > -jg


    You can compare Cortex-M3 to AVR32 UC3A and UC3B series, but not to
    AP7(hi-speed usb, mmu, linux) - it's a different class of devices.
    We also don't compare Intel Core2Duo to AVR ;)

    --
    voices (at) zrgnyyvpenva (dot) pbz [ROT13]

  10. Re: High-end AVR vs. low-end ARM?

    On Nov 7, 2:17*pm, "Ulf Samuelsson" wrote:
    > >>As for AVR32, in case you were thinking about that one, there is no
    > >>real reason I would know why to start with that device. Use a Cortex-
    > >>M3 device instead the upcoming standard.

    >
    > Let's see,
    >
    > Where do I get the Cortex-M3 flash chip with
    >
    > * Lower power consumption than any existing Cortex-M3 chip
    > * Single 1,8V +/- 10% power-supply for CORE *AND* I/O?
    > * 5V VCC , desirable for motor control?
    > * debug support allowing you to read/write internal registers without
    > stopping the MCU.
    > * High Speed USB
    > * Free Eclipse/GCC tool directly supported by the silicon vendor
    > * Sustained 33 DSP MIPS when doing vector sums
    > * * for(sum=0; i = 0; i < n; i++) sum = sum + C[i] * X[i];
    > * Migration path to low cost versions supporting Linux.
    > * Same H/W tools as the AVR (JTAG-ICE Mk II & STK600)
    > * Trace capable emulator at below $600 (AVRONE)
    >
    > Googling does not give any clue...
    >


    googling doesn't give you a clue for 1.8V, 5V AVR32s either....


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