+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 71

Difference between Oracle OCI and thin Driver?

  1. Difference between Oracle OCI and thin Driver?

    As far as I know there are two different options to acces the Oracle database:
    With the thin or the OCI driver.
    What is the difference ?

    Peter


  2. Re: Difference between Oracle OCI and thin Driver?



    Peter Swampton wrote:

    > As far as I know there are two different options to acces the Oracle database:
    > With the thin or the OCI driver.
    > What is the difference ?
    >
    > Peter


    The thin driver is all Java. It can run anywhere without needing any other oracle
    stuff installed. The OCI driver needs all the Oracle client installed. It uses
    Oracle's native client libraries to communicate with the DBMS. The thin driver
    just opens a raw socket to the DBMS and knows/uses the client-DBMS protocol itself.
    Originally the OCI driver was faster, but in recent years this has been fixed,
    especially for the 10g version of the thin driver. OCI has evolved too, but bugs
    in native OCI code can still kill an entire JVM, whereas the thin driver is
    completely safe in that regard.
    To tell an OCI driver where to connect, you just have to tell it the entry
    name in the tnsnames.ora file that is in it's ORACLE_HOME environment. With the
    thin driver, you give it the DBMS machine name, port number (1521 is default),
    and the DBMS's SID.
    I hope this helps a bit,
    Joe Weinstein at BEA


  3. Re: Difference between Oracle OCI and thin Driver?



    Peter Swampton wrote:

    > As far as I know there are two different options to acces the Oracle database:
    > With the thin or the OCI driver.
    > What is the difference ?
    >
    > Peter


    The thin driver is all Java. It can run anywhere without needing any other oracle
    stuff installed. The OCI driver needs all the Oracle client installed. It uses
    Oracle's native client libraries to communicate with the DBMS. The thin driver
    just opens a raw socket to the DBMS and knows/uses the client-DBMS protocol itself.
    Originally the OCI driver was faster, but in recent years this has been fixed,
    especially for the 10g version of the thin driver. OCI has evolved too, but bugs
    in native OCI code can still kill an entire JVM, whereas the thin driver is
    completely safe in that regard.
    To tell an OCI driver where to connect, you just have to tell it the entry
    name in the tnsnames.ora file that is in it's ORACLE_HOME environment. With the
    thin driver, you give it the DBMS machine name, port number (1521 is default),
    and the DBMS's SID.
    I hope this helps a bit,
    Joe Weinstein at BEA


  4. Re: Difference between Oracle OCI and thin Driver?



    Peter Swampton wrote:

    > As far as I know there are two different options to acces the Oracle database:
    > With the thin or the OCI driver.
    > What is the difference ?
    >
    > Peter


    The thin driver is all Java. It can run anywhere without needing any other oracle
    stuff installed. The OCI driver needs all the Oracle client installed. It uses
    Oracle's native client libraries to communicate with the DBMS. The thin driver
    just opens a raw socket to the DBMS and knows/uses the client-DBMS protocol itself.
    Originally the OCI driver was faster, but in recent years this has been fixed,
    especially for the 10g version of the thin driver. OCI has evolved too, but bugs
    in native OCI code can still kill an entire JVM, whereas the thin driver is
    completely safe in that regard.
    To tell an OCI driver where to connect, you just have to tell it the entry
    name in the tnsnames.ora file that is in it's ORACLE_HOME environment. With the
    thin driver, you give it the DBMS machine name, port number (1521 is default),
    and the DBMS's SID.
    I hope this helps a bit,
    Joe Weinstein at BEA


  5. Re: Difference between Oracle OCI and thin Driver?



    Peter Swampton wrote:

    > As far as I know there are two different options to acces the Oracle database:
    > With the thin or the OCI driver.
    > What is the difference ?
    >
    > Peter


    The thin driver is all Java. It can run anywhere without needing any other oracle
    stuff installed. The OCI driver needs all the Oracle client installed. It uses
    Oracle's native client libraries to communicate with the DBMS. The thin driver
    just opens a raw socket to the DBMS and knows/uses the client-DBMS protocol itself.
    Originally the OCI driver was faster, but in recent years this has been fixed,
    especially for the 10g version of the thin driver. OCI has evolved too, but bugs
    in native OCI code can still kill an entire JVM, whereas the thin driver is
    completely safe in that regard.
    To tell an OCI driver where to connect, you just have to tell it the entry
    name in the tnsnames.ora file that is in it's ORACLE_HOME environment. With the
    thin driver, you give it the DBMS machine name, port number (1521 is default),
    and the DBMS's SID.
    I hope this helps a bit,
    Joe Weinstein at BEA


  6. Re: Difference between Oracle OCI and thin Driver?



    Peter Swampton wrote:

    > As far as I know there are two different options to acces the Oracle database:
    > With the thin or the OCI driver.
    > What is the difference ?
    >
    > Peter


    The thin driver is all Java. It can run anywhere without needing any other oracle
    stuff installed. The OCI driver needs all the Oracle client installed. It uses
    Oracle's native client libraries to communicate with the DBMS. The thin driver
    just opens a raw socket to the DBMS and knows/uses the client-DBMS protocol itself.
    Originally the OCI driver was faster, but in recent years this has been fixed,
    especially for the 10g version of the thin driver. OCI has evolved too, but bugs
    in native OCI code can still kill an entire JVM, whereas the thin driver is
    completely safe in that regard.
    To tell an OCI driver where to connect, you just have to tell it the entry
    name in the tnsnames.ora file that is in it's ORACLE_HOME environment. With the
    thin driver, you give it the DBMS machine name, port number (1521 is default),
    and the DBMS's SID.
    I hope this helps a bit,
    Joe Weinstein at BEA


  7. Re: Difference between Oracle OCI and thin Driver?



    Peter Swampton wrote:

    > As far as I know there are two different options to acces the Oracle database:
    > With the thin or the OCI driver.
    > What is the difference ?
    >
    > Peter


    The thin driver is all Java. It can run anywhere without needing any other oracle
    stuff installed. The OCI driver needs all the Oracle client installed. It uses
    Oracle's native client libraries to communicate with the DBMS. The thin driver
    just opens a raw socket to the DBMS and knows/uses the client-DBMS protocol itself.
    Originally the OCI driver was faster, but in recent years this has been fixed,
    especially for the 10g version of the thin driver. OCI has evolved too, but bugs
    in native OCI code can still kill an entire JVM, whereas the thin driver is
    completely safe in that regard.
    To tell an OCI driver where to connect, you just have to tell it the entry
    name in the tnsnames.ora file that is in it's ORACLE_HOME environment. With the
    thin driver, you give it the DBMS machine name, port number (1521 is default),
    and the DBMS's SID.
    I hope this helps a bit,
    Joe Weinstein at BEA


  8. Re: Difference between Oracle OCI and thin Driver?



    Peter Swampton wrote:

    > As far as I know there are two different options to acces the Oracle database:
    > With the thin or the OCI driver.
    > What is the difference ?
    >
    > Peter


    The thin driver is all Java. It can run anywhere without needing any other oracle
    stuff installed. The OCI driver needs all the Oracle client installed. It uses
    Oracle's native client libraries to communicate with the DBMS. The thin driver
    just opens a raw socket to the DBMS and knows/uses the client-DBMS protocol itself.
    Originally the OCI driver was faster, but in recent years this has been fixed,
    especially for the 10g version of the thin driver. OCI has evolved too, but bugs
    in native OCI code can still kill an entire JVM, whereas the thin driver is
    completely safe in that regard.
    To tell an OCI driver where to connect, you just have to tell it the entry
    name in the tnsnames.ora file that is in it's ORACLE_HOME environment. With the
    thin driver, you give it the DBMS machine name, port number (1521 is default),
    and the DBMS's SID.
    I hope this helps a bit,
    Joe Weinstein at BEA


  9. Re: Difference between Oracle OCI and thin Driver?

    There's also the Oracle Instant Client (multi-platform) that (in
    Windows) installs by copying the folder to the PC and setting an
    environment variable (in Windows, add the folder to PATH). You can use
    TNSNAMES or not (you can use a connect string pointing directly to the
    server). If you use TNSNAMES, you need to add the TNS_ADMIN
    environment variable pointing to the folder containing the TNSNAMES.ORA
    file (I used same folder as the instant client). So far, this looks
    pretty good. It's a much simpler install (you don't need to use the
    Universal Installer) and removal is simply deleting the folder and
    removing the variables.

    There's a little more work involved if you use ODBC (just a batch file
    to install the driver), but that's MS's fault, not Oracle's.

    Here's a download link:
    http://www.oracle.com/technology/sof...ent/index.html

    .... and the FAQ:
    http://www.oracle.com/technology/tec...nt/ic-faq.html
    Jesse


  10. Re: Difference between Oracle OCI and thin Driver?

    There's also the Oracle Instant Client (multi-platform) that (in
    Windows) installs by copying the folder to the PC and setting an
    environment variable (in Windows, add the folder to PATH). You can use
    TNSNAMES or not (you can use a connect string pointing directly to the
    server). If you use TNSNAMES, you need to add the TNS_ADMIN
    environment variable pointing to the folder containing the TNSNAMES.ORA
    file (I used same folder as the instant client). So far, this looks
    pretty good. It's a much simpler install (you don't need to use the
    Universal Installer) and removal is simply deleting the folder and
    removing the variables.

    There's a little more work involved if you use ODBC (just a batch file
    to install the driver), but that's MS's fault, not Oracle's.

    Here's a download link:
    http://www.oracle.com/technology/sof...ent/index.html

    .... and the FAQ:
    http://www.oracle.com/technology/tec...nt/ic-faq.html
    Jesse


+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 ... LastLast