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change ORACLE_HOME

  1. change ORACLE_HOME

    hello:
    I have Oracle installed on a SunFire 280R with Solaris 2.8 on /oracle
    directory.
    I want to change the Oracle installed directory to /oracle/8.1.7.
    How can I make the change without reinstall Oracle.
    I have a cluster with 2 nodes. The tnslsnr.exe file is executed on
    /oracle/bin directory. I need this file will be executed on
    /oracle/8.1.7/bin directory.
    How can I make it?
    Thanks

  2. Re: change ORACLE_HOME

    mikerinos2000@hotmail.com wrote:
    > hello:
    > I have Oracle installed on a SunFire 280R with Solaris 2.8 on /oracle
    > directory.
    > I want to change the Oracle installed directory to /oracle/8.1.7.
    > How can I make the change without reinstall Oracle.
    > I have a cluster with 2 nodes. The tnslsnr.exe file is executed on
    > /oracle/bin directory. I need this file will be executed on
    > /oracle/8.1.7/bin directory.
    > How can I make it?
    > Thanks


    Not directly. The ORACLE_HOME value is hard-coded in way too many
    places by the Installer. The best (some would say only) solution is to
    come up with a good standard location for ORACLE_HOME and (re-)install
    it the same way on all your servers going forward. Read the Oracle OFA
    (Optimal Flexible Architecture) docs for more information. Doing this
    now will also greatly ease your upgrade path to newer versions of Oracle.

    You haven't stated what the underlying need is. If you have a new
    filesystem and just need to re-arrange storage, there is a possibility
    (next paragraph). If you have a HA cluster such as Veritas VCS, and you
    are trying to put the ORACLE_HOME on a shared filesystem that can move
    from one node to the other, be aware that this becomes a single point of
    failure. Better to redundantly install Oracle locally on each node and
    put only your data files on the shared filesystem.

    The following is NOT supported by Oracle, but it can be done (on Unix,
    at least, since there is no Windows registry to mess with). Make some
    kind of backup first (tar file, etc) so you can go back to where you
    started if necessary. Shut down all Oracle processes. Use a Unix
    utility such as "cp" or "rsync" to make sure you copy all ownerships,
    permissions, links, etc. Copy the install to some place like
    /opt/app/oracle/product/8.1.7, then link this directory back to /oracle.
    Again, this is NOT supported by Oracle Corp, so you better practice
    and test first in a non-production environment!

    In the end, it will take about as much time and be safer to just
    re-install. But if so, be sure you install the same options that were
    originally installed, including patches and OUI upgrades. I've seen
    examples where innocently installing unused options like Oracle Advanced
    Security caused hard-to-find problems with other software trying to
    access the database, such as Perl DBI.

    -Mark Bole





  3. Re: change ORACLE_HOME

    mikerinos2000@hotmail.com wrote:
    > hello:
    > I have Oracle installed on a SunFire 280R with Solaris 2.8 on /oracle
    > directory.
    > I want to change the Oracle installed directory to /oracle/8.1.7.
    > How can I make the change without reinstall Oracle.
    > I have a cluster with 2 nodes. The tnslsnr.exe file is executed on
    > /oracle/bin directory. I need this file will be executed on
    > /oracle/8.1.7/bin directory.
    > How can I make it?
    > Thanks


    Not directly. The ORACLE_HOME value is hard-coded in way too many
    places by the Installer. The best (some would say only) solution is to
    come up with a good standard location for ORACLE_HOME and (re-)install
    it the same way on all your servers going forward. Read the Oracle OFA
    (Optimal Flexible Architecture) docs for more information. Doing this
    now will also greatly ease your upgrade path to newer versions of Oracle.

    You haven't stated what the underlying need is. If you have a new
    filesystem and just need to re-arrange storage, there is a possibility
    (next paragraph). If you have a HA cluster such as Veritas VCS, and you
    are trying to put the ORACLE_HOME on a shared filesystem that can move
    from one node to the other, be aware that this becomes a single point of
    failure. Better to redundantly install Oracle locally on each node and
    put only your data files on the shared filesystem.

    The following is NOT supported by Oracle, but it can be done (on Unix,
    at least, since there is no Windows registry to mess with). Make some
    kind of backup first (tar file, etc) so you can go back to where you
    started if necessary. Shut down all Oracle processes. Use a Unix
    utility such as "cp" or "rsync" to make sure you copy all ownerships,
    permissions, links, etc. Copy the install to some place like
    /opt/app/oracle/product/8.1.7, then link this directory back to /oracle.
    Again, this is NOT supported by Oracle Corp, so you better practice
    and test first in a non-production environment!

    In the end, it will take about as much time and be safer to just
    re-install. But if so, be sure you install the same options that were
    originally installed, including patches and OUI upgrades. I've seen
    examples where innocently installing unused options like Oracle Advanced
    Security caused hard-to-find problems with other software trying to
    access the database, such as Perl DBI.

    -Mark Bole





  4. Re: change ORACLE_HOME

    mikerinos2000@hotmail.com wrote:
    > hello:
    > I have Oracle installed on a SunFire 280R with Solaris 2.8 on /oracle
    > directory.
    > I want to change the Oracle installed directory to /oracle/8.1.7.
    > How can I make the change without reinstall Oracle.
    > I have a cluster with 2 nodes. The tnslsnr.exe file is executed on
    > /oracle/bin directory. I need this file will be executed on
    > /oracle/8.1.7/bin directory.
    > How can I make it?
    > Thanks


    Not directly. The ORACLE_HOME value is hard-coded in way too many
    places by the Installer. The best (some would say only) solution is to
    come up with a good standard location for ORACLE_HOME and (re-)install
    it the same way on all your servers going forward. Read the Oracle OFA
    (Optimal Flexible Architecture) docs for more information. Doing this
    now will also greatly ease your upgrade path to newer versions of Oracle.

    You haven't stated what the underlying need is. If you have a new
    filesystem and just need to re-arrange storage, there is a possibility
    (next paragraph). If you have a HA cluster such as Veritas VCS, and you
    are trying to put the ORACLE_HOME on a shared filesystem that can move
    from one node to the other, be aware that this becomes a single point of
    failure. Better to redundantly install Oracle locally on each node and
    put only your data files on the shared filesystem.

    The following is NOT supported by Oracle, but it can be done (on Unix,
    at least, since there is no Windows registry to mess with). Make some
    kind of backup first (tar file, etc) so you can go back to where you
    started if necessary. Shut down all Oracle processes. Use a Unix
    utility such as "cp" or "rsync" to make sure you copy all ownerships,
    permissions, links, etc. Copy the install to some place like
    /opt/app/oracle/product/8.1.7, then link this directory back to /oracle.
    Again, this is NOT supported by Oracle Corp, so you better practice
    and test first in a non-production environment!

    In the end, it will take about as much time and be safer to just
    re-install. But if so, be sure you install the same options that were
    originally installed, including patches and OUI upgrades. I've seen
    examples where innocently installing unused options like Oracle Advanced
    Security caused hard-to-find problems with other software trying to
    access the database, such as Perl DBI.

    -Mark Bole





  5. Re: change ORACLE_HOME

    mikerinos2000@hotmail.com wrote:
    > hello:
    > I have Oracle installed on a SunFire 280R with Solaris 2.8 on /oracle
    > directory.
    > I want to change the Oracle installed directory to /oracle/8.1.7.
    > How can I make the change without reinstall Oracle.
    > I have a cluster with 2 nodes. The tnslsnr.exe file is executed on
    > /oracle/bin directory. I need this file will be executed on
    > /oracle/8.1.7/bin directory.
    > How can I make it?
    > Thanks


    Not directly. The ORACLE_HOME value is hard-coded in way too many
    places by the Installer. The best (some would say only) solution is to
    come up with a good standard location for ORACLE_HOME and (re-)install
    it the same way on all your servers going forward. Read the Oracle OFA
    (Optimal Flexible Architecture) docs for more information. Doing this
    now will also greatly ease your upgrade path to newer versions of Oracle.

    You haven't stated what the underlying need is. If you have a new
    filesystem and just need to re-arrange storage, there is a possibility
    (next paragraph). If you have a HA cluster such as Veritas VCS, and you
    are trying to put the ORACLE_HOME on a shared filesystem that can move
    from one node to the other, be aware that this becomes a single point of
    failure. Better to redundantly install Oracle locally on each node and
    put only your data files on the shared filesystem.

    The following is NOT supported by Oracle, but it can be done (on Unix,
    at least, since there is no Windows registry to mess with). Make some
    kind of backup first (tar file, etc) so you can go back to where you
    started if necessary. Shut down all Oracle processes. Use a Unix
    utility such as "cp" or "rsync" to make sure you copy all ownerships,
    permissions, links, etc. Copy the install to some place like
    /opt/app/oracle/product/8.1.7, then link this directory back to /oracle.
    Again, this is NOT supported by Oracle Corp, so you better practice
    and test first in a non-production environment!

    In the end, it will take about as much time and be safer to just
    re-install. But if so, be sure you install the same options that were
    originally installed, including patches and OUI upgrades. I've seen
    examples where innocently installing unused options like Oracle Advanced
    Security caused hard-to-find problems with other software trying to
    access the database, such as Perl DBI.

    -Mark Bole





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