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NTP on Solaris 10

  1. NTP on Solaris 10

    Hello,

    I configured a machine (running Solaris 10) as NTP client as follows:

    I created a file /etc/inet/ntp.conf
    the file contains:
    server

    I enables NTP:
    svcadm enable network/ntp


    The time is synchronized with the NTP-server.
    However, when I modify the time/date with 'date' the time is never
    resynchronized again automatically (unless I reboot the machine of
    course).

    My question:
    Is it possible to configure the machine in such a way that it
    resynchronizes its time periodically (e.g. every hour)?


  2. Re: NTP on Solaris 10

    m_radstake@hotmail.com wrote:

    >
    > The time is synchronized with the NTP-server.
    > However, when I modify the time/date with 'date' the time is never
    > resynchronized again automatically (unless I reboot the machine of
    > course).


    Probably time gap between system and NTP is too large and ntp daemon exits.

    > My question:
    > Is it possible to configure the machine in such a way that it
    > resynchronizes its time periodically (e.g. every hour)?


    Put in root's crontab something like:
    * 2,4,6,8,10... * * * /usr/sbin/ntpdate -s some.ntp.server


    --
    Miroslav

  3. Re: NTP on Solaris 10

    In <1194794861.918269.59310@50g2000hsm.googlegroups.com> m_radstake@hotmail.com writes:

    >I configured a machine (running Solaris 10) as NTP client as follows:


    >I created a file /etc/inet/ntp.conf
    >the file contains:
    >server


    >I enables NTP:
    >svcadm enable network/ntp


    >The time is synchronized with the NTP-server.


    That's how it should work. Type `ntpq -p' on that machine to see how
    it's doing. You can also put more than one server name in the
    ntp.conf file.

    >However, when I modify the time/date with 'date' the time is never
    >resynchronized again automatically (unless I reboot the machine of
    >course).


    Why did you do that? NTP expects that only it changes the time.
    You could disable and enable it again, but why do that?

    >Is it possible to configure the machine in such a way that it
    >resynchronizes its time periodically (e.g. every hour)?


    The way that NTP works is that it will resynchronize the time whenever
    it needs to do so. The interval that it chooses depends on how stable
    the time is on the client.


    --
    -Gary Mills- -Unix Support- -U of M Academic Computing and Networking-

  4. Re: NTP on Solaris 10

    Hi,

    m_radstake@hotmail.com wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I configured a machine (running Solaris 10) as NTP client as follows:
    >
    > I created a file /etc/inet/ntp.conf
    > the file contains:
    > server
    >
    > I enables NTP:
    > svcadm enable network/ntp
    >
    >
    > The time is synchronized with the NTP-server.
    > However, when I modify the time/date with 'date' the time is never
    > resynchronized again automatically (unless I reboot the machine of
    > course).
    >

    Why are you manually changing the date when you have enabled ntp?


    > My question:
    > Is it possible to configure the machine in such a way that it
    > resynchronizes its time periodically (e.g. every hour)?
    >

    Use ntp, you do not wanny change the date with the date command, time
    can change to much to fast casuing processer to go crazy, thats why ntp
    changes the time slowly.

    So enable ntp and skip manually setting time.

    /michael

  5. Re: NTP on Solaris 10

    Gary Mills wrote:
    > In <1194794861.918269.59310@50g2000hsm.googlegroups.com> m_radstake@hotmail.com writes:
    >
    >
    >>I configured a machine (running Solaris 10) as NTP client as follows:

    >
    >
    >>I created a file /etc/inet/ntp.conf
    >>the file contains:
    >>server

    >
    >
    >>I enables NTP:
    >>svcadm enable network/ntp

    >
    >
    >>The time is synchronized with the NTP-server.

    >
    >
    > That's how it should work. Type `ntpq -p' on that machine to see how
    > it's doing. You can also put more than one server name in the
    > ntp.conf file.
    >
    >
    >>However, when I modify the time/date with 'date' the time is never
    >>resynchronized again automatically (unless I reboot the machine of
    >>course).

    >
    >
    > Why did you do that? NTP expects that only it changes the time.
    > You could disable and enable it again, but why do that?


    I guess some people want to see ntpd correct the time!


  6. Re: NTP on Solaris 10

    On Nov 11, 9:36 pm, "Richard B. Gilbert"
    wrote:

    > I guess some people want to see ntpd correct the time!


    There are restrictions on how much clock skew NTP will correct
    unattended. I'm not sure what they are, but they're not enormous (it
    won't correct an hour for instance). There are good reasons for this
    though I forget the details - at least one of them is to deal with
    peers which have gone mad I think.

    So, really, if you use ntp you want to let it keep the time correct
    and not try and muck around with the clock yourself.

    --tim


  7. Re: NTP on Solaris 10

    On 12 nov, 16:16, Tim Bradshaw wrote:
    > On Nov 11, 9:36 pm, "Richard B. Gilbert"
    > wrote:
    >
    > > I guess some people want to see ntpd correct the time!

    >
    > There are restrictions on how much clock skew NTP will correct
    > unattended. I'm not sure what they are, but they're not enormous (it
    > won't correct an hour for instance). There are good reasons for this
    > though I forget the details - at least one of them is to deal with
    > peers which have gone mad I think.
    >
    > So, really, if you use ntp you want to let it keep the time correct
    > and not try and muck around with the clock yourself.
    >
    > --tim




    Hello all,

    Thanks for the answers and suggestions.
    The reason I wanted to change the time manually is to see if NTP
    corrects it.

    I probably made the difference too huge. Because, when I set a
    difference of a couple of seconds it is corrected after a while.

    Regards,
    Marcel


  8. Re: NTP on Solaris 10

    m_radstake@hotmail.com wrote:

    >
    > Hello all,
    >
    > Thanks for the answers and suggestions.
    > The reason I wanted to change the time manually is to see if NTP
    > corrects it.


    If you want to know how well the NTP corrects the time, then I suggest
    you check it with a wrist watch like this:

    http://www.leapsecond.com/pages/atomic-bill/

    The web site:

    http://www.leapsecond.com/

    has some interesting stuff on time measurement. Tom, the site's author,
    claims to have the most accurate clock in the world, outside of a
    government laboratory. (And I bet there are many govenment standards
    labs with less accurate clocks)

    He does things like take atomic clocks up mountains to see how much
    slower they run!

    http://www.leapsecond.com/great2005/index.htm
    http://www.leapsecond.com/pages/atomic-tom/

    One of the other pages I like on his site, which will appear to RF
    engineers more than IT people, is his chess set.

    http://www.leapsecond.com/pages/chess/









  9. Re: NTP on Solaris 10

    Tim Bradshaw wrote:
    > On Nov 11, 9:36 pm, "Richard B. Gilbert"
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I guess some people want to see ntpd correct the time!

    >
    > There are restrictions on how much clock skew NTP will correct
    > unattended. I'm not sure what they are, but they're not enormous (it
    > won't correct an hour for instance).


    The limit after startup is 1000 seconds. NTP will print an error
    message about the limit to syslog and exit.

    > There are good reasons for this though I forget the details - at least
    > one of them is to deal with peers which have gone mad I think.


    Exactly. NTP is supposed to keep very fine control of the clock and has
    a control limit of 500PPM. Sudden leaps are presumed to be something
    catostrophic happening that should be dealt with outside of NTP. Once
    corrected, you can restart NTP.

    > So, really, if you use ntp you want to let it keep the time correct
    > and not try and muck around with the clock yourself.


    Yes. NTP will correct jumps of less than 1000s, but it may take up to
    half an hour for it to believe that the jump is correct.

    The OP should post the output of 'ntpq -p' a half hour after the time
    jump.

    --
    Darren Dunham ddunham@taos.com
    Senior Technical Consultant TAOS http://www.taos.com/
    Got some Dr Pepper? San Francisco, CA bay area
    < This line left intentionally blank to confuse you. >

  10. Re: NTP on Solaris 10

    m_radstake@hotmail.com wrote:
    > On 12 nov, 16:16, Tim Bradshaw wrote:
    >
    >>On Nov 11, 9:36 pm, "Richard B. Gilbert"
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I guess some people want to see ntpd correct the time!

    >>
    >>There are restrictions on how much clock skew NTP will correct
    >>unattended. I'm not sure what they are, but they're not enormous (it
    >>won't correct an hour for instance). There are good reasons for this
    >>though I forget the details - at least one of them is to deal with
    >>peers which have gone mad I think.
    >>
    >>So, really, if you use ntp you want to let it keep the time correct
    >>and not try and muck around with the clock yourself.
    >>
    >>--tim

    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Hello all,
    >
    > Thanks for the answers and suggestions.
    > The reason I wanted to change the time manually is to see if NTP
    > corrects it.
    >
    > I probably made the difference too huge. Because, when I set a
    > difference of a couple of seconds it is corrected after a while.


    Maybe this one should go in the FAQ. ISTR seeing similar messages in
    the past.



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